Amos

Amos, the name means encumbered, and it was fitting for this little 3 year old boy. We only had the information from the shelter to go on ... Amos couldn't tell us exactly what his life had been like up to the point he was surrendered to the shelter... Now we know the information given to the shelter was most likely not complete or accurate ... What truly caused Amos to be aggressive ... We'll never know... Col. Potter gave Amos a chance ...

We were contacted by a shelter of a Cairn surrendered by the owner because they were dying of cancer. He was described as mouthy, didn't like to be picked up and had tried to bite an inexperienced shelter volunteer. A very seasoned CP volunteer temperament tested him at the shelter agreed he was a typical, young, alpha, untrained Cairn and signed the paperwork to release him to Col. Potter. While loading him into the crate for transport to the vet, he whirled his head around and bit our volunteer on the hand. This required a bite report and 10 days of quarantine.

Unfortunately, this was not the last bite or aggressive behavior from Amos. He turned into the Tasmanian Devil while being examined at the vet, but the remainder of his stay was relatively uneventful, so we had high hopes for him once he could get into a foster home situation and away from the stress of the shelter and being boarded. Our hopes were dashed repeatedly by Amos once he arrived at his foster home ...

He bit or attempted to bite repeatedly and with different people, during different situations, showing no signs of remorse or that he had done anything wrong. Amos was extremely aggressive with other animals and would best be described as having rage syndrome with it nearly impossible to calm him down. Amos truly wanted to do things his way and was not afraid to let you know what he wanted or didn't want, doing the talking with his teeth. He was fostered by a very experienced dog trainer who has worked with many troubled dogs of different breeds. A second trainer was also consulted and spent time with Amos with the same results. When the biting incidents became daily occurrences and he started charging people, we knew there was no other alternative for Amos, but let him go to the Rainbow Bridge...

In many ways Amos acted like a bait dog, yet he had no physical signs of it on his body. But there are many different ways to use a small dog as bait including having them confined in a small run adjacent to another larger run so he can't get away from the attacking dog, can't truly get physically hurt, and learns to "spar" with the attacking dog through the fence. This is what Amos did with every dog he met ... he went to attack and went for the jugular.

It is never easy to send a furkid to the Bridge, but especially a young, adorable, healthy one. We wish we knew exactly what had happened to Amos in his past to make him this way. We wish we knew a magic way to erase this damage and the demons he carried with him. We only wish it would have had a different ending for Amos ...

When you look at the two pictures of Amos taken the day of intake, you see an adorable little boy that should have had a full life, but for unknown reasons was deprived of that life. He's running free of his demons at the Rainbow Bridge right now, a happy, loving little boy who only wants to give kisses to everyone he meets rather than bite them and is happily playing with all the other furkids rather than wanting to kill them. This is the image to hold in your heart of Amos.

You will always be remembered, Amos, and you were loved and cared about as a CP kid. We truly wish it could have been a different ending.